PhotoPrism is a open source application to store and manage videos and photos using an AI-powered engine. It’s a simpler option than other cloud providers when it comes to pictures and videos, and it can be installed on a server, in the cloud, or as simple app on a Raspberry Pi.

At first, I tried to use Podman, the daemon-less container engine I’ve been using a lot lately. However, Raspberry Pi is based on Debian, and podman-compose isn’t available there yet. In the end, I used Docker instead. Keep this in mind if you want to use a Raspberry pi for deploying PhotoPrism.

To make it as easy as possible for users to install and maintain, especially compared to other large applications, PhotoPrism has many different options for installation. I’m focusing on using containers on Raspberry Pi OS. Before getting started, ensure that you’ve installed Raspberry Pi OS on a 64-bit Pi, and that you have at least 4GB or more RAM available.

First, install these dependencies:

Then download the docker-compose.yml for PhotoPrism from GitHub:

The docker-compose.yml has all the options required to configure PhotoPrism. Use your favorite text editor to view docker-compose.yml:

That’s a lot of information, and can take some time to go through if you want a customized deployment.

The first few options you definitely want to change is the password of the database, and the admin user to login into the UI:

Change these variables to passwords according to your security requirements.

The next required configuration option is the /host/folder:/photoprism/folder. The directory path on the left side of the colon (:) is the path mounted on your physical Pi. The right side is the location that location is mapped to inside the container. All paths inside the container must start with /photoprism/.

After making any changes you want, save the file and return to the terminal. Now you can start up PhotoPrism for the first time:

This pulls in a new version of the application. It can take some time to do this, because it has to download all the necessary container images. After the process finishes, open a web browser and navigate to http://myip:2342/ (where myip is the IP of your Raspberry Pi).

Use the admin user and password set in PHOTOPRISM_ADMIN_PASSWORD to log in.

PhotoPrism on a Pi

You’re running PhotoPrism! It’s that easy. Take a tour of its UI, and start uploading photos. I’ve been using PhotoPrism for a few months now, and my photo collection is, for the first time ever, has meaning and context, and I didn’t have to spend any time making it happen. Give PhotoPrism a try for yourself and then for your organization. You’re guaranteed to look like a hero!


Author

  • Adebisi Oyawale

    Hola, name is Adebisi Oyawale. Some Information about me: I love cats I love Gardening From Carolina, Puerto Rico Nerdy things like electronics, video games and anime Being a goof ball


Adebisi Oyawale

Hola, name is Adebisi Oyawale. Some Information about me: I love cats I love Gardening From Carolina, Puerto Rico Nerdy things like electronics, video games and anime Being a goof ball

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